Observing Ruth

Posted by on Jun 30, 2017 in Bible study | 0 comments

Welcome back to Ruth. It has been a week since your first assignment to listen to and read the little jewel in its entirety. Hopefully, you have all your supplies, too. By the way, in case you missed it, I wrote about my favorite tools and resources Monday.

Let’s dive in…

As you think about this small book, here are some questions I want you to answer right off the bat (grab your paper and pen and make a few notes). Work through these over the weekend and then Monday, we’ll move into our next assignment.

Read all of Ruth. What type of biblical genre is Ruth? Right now, watch the video below and make a note on your page about the primary literary style of Ruth.

  • Now, having read and listened to Ruth so much this past week, jot down some notes about when this book takes place? Although you may not have specifics of the year, at least mark the general time of this book.
  • Go back and list the key people in this book.
  • Summarize in one sentence the gist of this book. What’s it about?
  • What are the geographical spots on the map where this is occurring?
  • Make a list of some of the key words and/or phrases that you have seen. Key words and phrases are most often repeated and important words. No need to think of a ton of words here, but what are some important words that have grabbed your attention?
  • Why would this book have made it into the canon of Scripture? If you’ve ever ventured through Matthew, you may have scorned the first 17 verses, but oh my, these are really neat verses in Scripture. Go there and read them and note who you see.
  • Remember the metanarrative of Scripture? That the Bible reveals that promise about the offspring he made to Adam and Eve and reveals the fulfillment a morsel at a time over the course of 66 books? See Genesis 3 and read about the promised offspring. Who is this offspring? Well, each book of Scripture begins to enlighten us as to the one who is THE offspring. It’s not Cain and Abel, nor any of Eve’s other children. And so we read about Noah, then Abraham, and then the next book in the Bible and find out it’s not Moses, Aaron, nor Miriam nor any of their children, and so the books go…until God reveals more things about this offspring (aka Messiah). It’s fascinating and it’s life altering and I’m all excited! So, how does Ruth fit into the meta narrative of Scripture?
  • Lastly, what are some questions you have about this book? If you have some, list them. Also, are there any words you don’t quite understand? Jot them down and look up their meaning in a Bible or English dictionary.

Make sure you have the rest of your supplies ready for Monday at which point I’ll return for further observation into Ruth.

And after all this reading about gleaning in the fields and harvesting of grain, I’m craving a nice warm fibrous loaf of homemade bread and a smidgen of honey butter…

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